Everystring.com | Photography by Anna Fishkin
Everystring.com | Photography by Anna Fishkin
Everystring.com | Photography by Anna Fishkin
Everystring.com | Photography by Anna Fishkin
Everystring.com | Photography by Anna Fishkin

Photography Blog

Leafy Natural Couture

Images from a beautiful morning photo-shoot with Leafy Natural Couture.

 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)

Links:
Swimsuit: Leafy Natural Couture - www.leafy.com.br
Location: Coco Tulum Hotel – www.cocotulum.com
Model: Rebecca Jo – ablogbyrebeccajo.tumblr.com

Playa Azul – Tulum, Mexico

Interior photography, Playa Azul Hotel.

 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)

Yoga Paradise

Some of the beautiful yogis in Tulum, Mexico, photographed during sunset practicing acro-yoga on the beach and SUP yoga in a nearby cenote.

 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)

My Way Luxury Resort – Tulum, Mexico

Recent client work for Tulum’s new boutique hotel – My Way.

 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)

Hanal Pixán 2013 – Abandoned Hacienda Expo

Couple of weeks ago, during Mexico’s Day of the Dead weekend I was visiting my two photographer friends - Masha Osipova and Mauricio Palos - in Merida, Yucatán. We decided to play a 24-hour game. The objective was to:

1.
Conceive of an idea for a photo-shoot using historically or culturally significant location
We scouted Merida’s incredible abandoned haciendas left over from prosperous days of Yucatan’s henequén cactus production and distribution (read my previous story about Merida’s significance to the peninsula.) Palos said he knew of one huge house that might work in a place called Cholul on the outskirts of the city.

2. Shoot
We drove on a whim to check the place out and it was perfect. The shoot took four hours to complete and we switched playing different roles – director, model, production assistant, etc. My idea was to turn Masha into a live altar decorated with marigold flowers picked up in a village on the way to Cholul. We also composed a couple of shots of a jungle-ninja character together. The night before we went to see Gravity. Masha was inspired and threw another challenge in the game – to use an element from the film in her image. Mauricio wanted Masha and I to characterize two ghost-sisters, daughters of a European plantation owner who continue wandering around the hacienda until present day.

3. Print
Each of us had to choose two-three final images to print. We found a local printer in Merida who was able to accommodate large format.

4. Exhibit
For the expo we decided to paste our prints on the walls inside the hacienda where we took them (haha, to entertain all the borrachos and drogadictos who may use the house to crash.) At this point in the game I had to return to Tulum for a job, so Masha and Palos promised to complete it without me. A day or two later, my friends organized to make the paste at home, then jumped on Mauricio’s bike and went back to Cholul, taking care of all the remaining business. When the work was finished, they took incredible photos to share with me, which now I’m happy to share with you.

Some image selections from the shoot:

 (Anna Fishkin)
 (Mauricio Palos)
 (Mauricio Palos)
 (Mauricio Palos)
 (Masha Osipova)
 (Anna Fishkin)
 (Anna Fishkin)

Images of the expo:





GlamRocks Jewelry Fall/Winter 2013

Images from my shoot for Fall/Winter 2013 GlamRocks Jewelry lookbook in Chicago.

 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)

Links:
www.glamrocksjewelry.com

TAO Inspired Living Residential Community

For the TAO Inspired Living project I was hired to create a library of images that showcase values of connection, inspiration, creativity and compassion upon which this development was built. Located in a stunning jungle landscape along Riviera Maya’s Caribbean coast and designed with elegance and simplicity, TAO is a community of residents who share a common desire for a healthy, inspired life that is in balance with our environment and the greater world.

 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)

TAO Wellness Center, Riviera Maya, Mexico

I’m happy to finally unveil a selection of images created for my latest client – beautifully designed Wellness Center at TAO Inspired Living development in Riviera Maya, Mexico. In the next post I will share photos of private residences, exteriors and golf courses that comprise the rest of the project.

 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)

Hooked on Yoga

In the beginning of 2013 I took my previously sporadic yoga practice to a much more disciplined level of focus and consistency. It changed my life. I would like to share a few recent images marking my progress.

 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)

GlamRocks Jewelry Spring/Summer 2013

Earlier this month I had a wonderful time shooting new look book images for GlamRocks Jewelry Spring/Summer 2013 collection. I want to express an enormous thanks to Kristen Davis Molenhouse for trusting me to capture the beauty of her lovely designs, to Mariam Dedyn for her glow and inspiration, and of course to the beaches of Tulum for morning light brilliance.

 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)
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Links:
www.glamrocksjewelry.com

Copper Town: Santa Clara del Cobre, Michoacán

In this story I’m switching gears to Central Mexico. Two months ago while traveling through Pátzcuaro region in the state of Michoacán I visited a magic little town called Santa Clara del Cobre. Since the Pátzcuaro region is mostly populated by the Tarascan or P’urhépecha people whose ancestors originally settled here in the 12th century, even during pre-Hispanic times many small towns in the area have been known for specific traditional trades functional to this day. Santa Clara del Cobre is one such municipality famous since pre-Columbian era for its masters of copper craftsmanship, with P’urhépecha coppersmithing skills superior even to Zapotec people of Oaxaca, the only other indigenous Mexican group that excelled in metallurgy. After the Spanish arrived, local people had adapted some European coppersmithing techniques and further advanced their industry, diligently passing down their skills to new generations. Dominating in copper crafts during colonial times, the town of Santa Clara del Cobre continued to thrive well into the 19th century at which point the industry almost collapsed due to major economic slumps in the region. It was revived again in the 20th century and especially in 1970′s thanks to the efforts of an American artist and sculptor James Metcalf and his Mexican wife Ana Pellicer who opened and operated a studio there. Today once again most of the population of Santa Clara del Cobre is employed by coppersmith trade with 250 registered workshops around town producing about 450 tons of copper each year. For this photo-story I photographed the workshop and techniques of the wonderful master coppersmith Rafael Zarco Soto and his workers. These guys can really create any item from copper imaginable - from bathtubs, sinks, and kitchen utensils to furniture and even delicate jewelry.

 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)
 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)

Story sponsored by:

Mexico Kan Tours

Quick Dip in Grand Cenote

Undoubtedly, one of the most beautiful and truly unique phenomena in Yucatan are cenotes. A multitude of these fresh water sinkholes can be found throughout the area exposed as a result of limestone cave roof collapse. To the ancient Maya cenotes were sacred points of entrance to Xibalba, the underworld inhabited by death gods and spirits whose stories are told in Mayan creation myth of Popol Vuh. In reality cenotes are a small glimpse into an entire underground river system covering most of Yucatan Peninsula, which actually looks like an enormous subterranean Swiss cheese. What’s even more incredible is that all these caves were originally created by a meteorite impact 65 million years ago, same one that caused mass extinction of the dinosaurs. Scientists actually used the increased density and circular alignment of cenotes to identify the rim of Chicxulub crater, which is more than 180 km (110 mi) in diameter and is one of the largest confirmed impact structures on Earth! These are all the things I think about as I jump in a cenote on a particularly hot afternoon.

 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)

End of the World Kite Story

If you’ve been following my blog, you may already know that I often hang out with local Tulum kitesurfing friends who flock here from all over the world during winter. The guys at OceanProKite love to put on a show when I bring my camera just as much as I love shooting it, which over the past couple of years led to a symbiotic relationship that always produces beautiful pictures. The kitesurfing session in this story happened on December 21, 2012, at one of the wild Caribbean beaches in Sian Ka’an Biosphere. The wind brought some clouds and rain, and everyone played with the elements like it was their last day on earth – a rather fitting way to celebrate winter solstice and end of Mayan calendar.

 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)

Maya Sky

I spent the night of December 21 doing what I love most – shooting the sky. Completely impromptu at 1am, I drove with a friend to the nearby archeological site of Muyil, 25 km from Tulum, Mexico, woke up the sleeping Mayan guard and convinced him to let me shoot the deserted pyramid in the middle of the jungle. My friend Masha did an amazing job light painting the pyramid with her mobile phone. Here’s one of the resulting images of winter solstice sky at Mayan ruins of Muyil, Quintana Roo.

 (Anna Fishkin)

Laser light beaming from ‘Time and Space 2012′ – huge international psycho-trance music festival held for three days in Tankah bay. With the help of northern wind, the massive sound from there could be heard as far as CESiaK in Sian Ka’an biosphere 20km south, where I took this photo.

 (Anna Fishkin)

The December 21st star-chasing marathon shooting session ended at 4am in Sian Ka’an biosphere. Many thanks to the Milky Way for revealing itself in full glory above and beyond.

 (Anna Fishkin)

On Maya Space and Time

The much hyped about date of December 21, 2012, is a couple of days away. Since I live on Yucatan peninsula, land of the Maya, many people ask me what I think about the Mayan calendar and its prediction of the end of the world. The truth is, since I make the choice to live with total awareness that every single day, not just this particular winter solstice, could easily be my last – I’m simply not worried about predictions and interpretations made by other people, even if they are as fascinating as the Maya. Every day I focus on my own direct relationship with reality, the cosmos, and myself, a process which has already allowed me to fulfill many big dreams and left no room for regret. So if the world does end because of some magic cataclysmic event, then so be it, I’ve certainly lived my life to the fullest. My only hope in that case is to see some aliens involved, to make my last photo-reportage truly worthwhile! And if the world doesn’t end, but changes in any profound way, it won’t be because someone foresaw it, but because enough individuals wanted it to change and used the prediction as a springboard to create their own self-fulfilling prophecy, which in time perhaps achieved a larger scale. In which case too, so be it. Whatever happens or doesn’t happen, the good outcome of all this hype is that the mere thought of the world ending in 2012 made so many people question their priorities and their source of happiness this year. And I’m all for consciousness and truth!

Of course, I am in absolute awe of the Mayan cosmological view and over the past three years have had the privilege of visiting most archeological sites in Yucatan and beyond. Thus, it’s only appropriate that I share here my photos from ancient Mayan cities and sites of Tulum, Coba, Ek Balam, Chichen Itza, Izamal, Campeche, Loltun, Kohunlich, Calakmul, Muyil, Palenque, plus the Mayan wing of National Anthropology Museum in Mexico City.

 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)Calakmul, Campeche, Mexico (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)

Day of the Dead 2012: Night at the Cemeteries

During the Night of November 1-2 is Noche de los Muertos. In central Mexico’s state of Michoacan, local residents of towns around lake Pátzcuaro with fun-to-pronounce ancestral Tarascan names like Tzintzuntzan, Ihuatzio, and Chucuchucho, take their Day of the Dead traditions very seriously. With great curiosity I joined their annual pilgrimage to nearby cemeteries for all-night vigils in order to honor departed souls. Driving from village to village throughout the night, I was continuously impressed how literally every cemetery in the region was set aglow by thousands of candles, illuminating everywhere the marigold-laden altars carefully erected by living relatives and loved ones of the dead. In some locations the cemeteries were hidden and intimate, while in others they stretched adjacent to town cathedrals and crowded craft markets with live music and countless vendors offering an incredible variety of Mexican street food favorites. Wide-eyed and spellbound I indulged in taking night-time photos, while keeping myself warm by drinking homemade steaming-hot fruit punch prepared and sold everywhere by local Mexican grandmothers. It all went down so well mixed with tequila…

 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)
 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)
 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)

One of the cemeteries still fresh in my mind was a rather tiny one, located on the hill top of Isla de la Pacanda – a small island in the middle of lake Pátzcuaro, which is accessible by boat and populated by only about 200 people from the same 20 families who had probably lived there forever. Gliding through the night across black water toward shimmering lights of the island in the distance, all the while listening to onboard musical score in the form of melodic indigenous Purapecha songs, I thought about how peaceful and appropriate the local attitude towards death was, how devoid of fear, and how radiant of some kind of pure magic… Instead of focusing on emotionally negative outcomes of loss and mourning, the purpose of this holiday was clearly intended to celebrate aspects of death experience that transcend sorrow. By bringing the deceased food and personal items they favored during lifetime, by spending time with them graveside, the local traditions center around honoring personal legacy of the deceased as something that remains alive and present in the living as a result of the gifts of influence the dead had left behind. To see death from this perspective and to be able to relate to the significance of local people’s intimate relationship with it, is to understand the spiritual and transformative power lying at the root of Mexican culture.

 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)

I will conclude the second installment of my Day of the Dead photo-story with these beautiful words by Octavio Paz:

 “The word Death is not pronounced in New York, in Paris, in London, because it burns the lips. The Mexican, in contrast, is familiar with Death, jokes about it, caresses it, sleeps with it, celebrates it; it is one of his favorite toys and his most steadfast love.”

Story sponsored by:

Mexico Kan Tours

Day of the Dead 2012: Pátzcuaro Region, Mexico

Last week I was sponsored by Mexico Kan Tours, Tulum-based agency specializing in conscious travel, to visit central Mexico’s state of Michoacan for a photo-reportage of the famous Day of the Dead festivities held in towns and villages near Morelia and lake Pátzcuaro. Sharing the same values in travel with my friends at Mexico Kan Tours, I was overjoyed at the opportunity to collaborate because all of us strive to present to our respective audiences a deeper look into Mexico’s complex culture, something sadly missed by vast numbers of visitors to this country who do not venture out of ubiquitous resorts. But all work aside, witnessing Day and Night of the Dead in Michoacan has been my personal bucket-list item for a very long time, therefore I immediately jumped at this last-minute chance to travel, to photograph the celebration, and to ultimately share with everyone what I came to know as one of the most beautiful traditions in the world.

Day of the Dead or Día de los Muertos on November 2 is one of the most important national holidays in Mexico and is a perfect time to observe in action how the beliefs of contemporary Mexican people stem from a foundation based in the blending and layering of complicated indigenous cultures with Catholic traditions of Spanish invaders. Because of the great variety of indigenous groups throughout Mexico, the specific traditions and rituals also vary from region to region. For the most part, the actual Day of the Dead festivities begin on November 1, which is called the Day of Little Angels or Día de los Angelitos, devoted specifically to honoring deceased infants and children. Preparations for celebrating start on November 31, the day when local people gather to decorate the streets with myriads of marigolds and build altars to honor the dead. The variety of altars is creatively impressive since they’re not always devoted to people’s actual dead relatives. Altar-building competitions are held throughout the area’s schools and I have seen altars honoring dead kings, queens, and famous saints like Mother Theresa. Some altars are more abstract and aren’t devoted to people at all. One of my favorites was actually built to honor maize, better known as corn – Mexico’s most important food staple, which someone depicted in their altar as crying and ultimately dead as a result of being replaced by new genetically-modified breeds.

As I allowed myself to be guided by the camera and talked to people in my slowly-improving Spanish, what I saw and what I hoped to capture in my images was the utmost care and seriousness with which people infuse their preparation process. It struck me as pure, meditative and absolutely profound! For this reason I devote the first installment of my Day of the Dead coverage exclusively to day-time preparations.

 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)
 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)
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 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)

Story sponsored by:

Mexico Kan Tours

Return to Sian Ka’an Lagoons

From the streets of NYC straight into the tangled jungles of Sian Ka’an biosphere… Admittedly, the transition was rough at times, but in the end came relief of knowing I can handle my extremes. And for that I’m grateful.

 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)

Good Night New York

Like a migratory bird, I recently flew south to Mexico for winter. But before I switch to posting images of sunny skies, turquoise waves and pre-columbian cities, I want to share these last few night-time photos of New York. To everyone I dearly miss in my favorite concrete jungle – I say goodnight and sweet winter dreams!

 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)
 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)
 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)
 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)

Urban Landscapes: New York City

I continue my urban image series with these soaring landscapes of New York. Encompassing day and night, earth and sky, light and water, this is my humble homage to the city that knows the secret to remaining beautiful and energetic despite continuous lack of sleep.

 (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin) (Anna Fishkin)


Sky Stories

Maya Sky Sian Ka'an
Maya Sky

I spent the night of December 21 doing what I love most – shooting the sky. Completely impromp…

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Events

Day of the Dead
Day of the Dead 2012: Night at the Cemeteries

During the Night of November 1-2 is Noche de los Muertos. In central Mexico’s state of Michoa…

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Archeology

Chichen Itza
On Maya Space and Time

The much hyped about date of December 21, 2012, is a couple of days away. Since I live on Yucatan pe…

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Locations

Yoga Upstate New York
Hooked on Yoga

In the beginning of 2013 I took my previously sporadic yoga practice to a much more disciplined leve…

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People

Santa Clara del Cobre Coppersmiths
Copper Town: Santa Clara del Cobre, Michoacán

In this story I’m switching gears to Central Mexico. Two months ago while traveling through P…

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